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Ti550 Engine Cooling Fan [SOLVED]
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Old 07-02-2018, 07:13 AM
Markev Markev is offline
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Default Ti550 Engine Cooling Fan [SOLVED]

Nissan 2012 Ti550 Pathfinder. V9X engine. 101,000km. All services completed on schedule. Now out of extended warranty.
During an air conditioner regas/check the auto electrician said the a/c was fine but the engine cooling fan wasnít working. Apparently this causes the ďhigh side of the a/c to get too high and as a result the air conditioner doesnít function well.
They arrived at the conclusion that the actual engine fan was faulty because it spins freely without any resistance. They recommend taking the car to a mechanic to repair or replace the fan. Is the V9X engine fan supposed to have resistance when manually spun? I thought I read somewhere it operates differently to other engine fans.
The earliest Nissan booking i could make is ten days away for them to do an initial diagnosis. Iím wondering if thereís a fuse, sensor etc that I could check beforehand, hoping the fan is OK and thereís a simple explanation for the engine fan not to be working. Not sure if thereís fan fuses etc under the bonnet that I could check. Canít find any relevant fuse inside the cabin near the glovebox, but not having any mechanical knowledge I donít really know what fuse to look for.
Any advice / suggestions appreciated.
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Old 07-02-2018, 09:14 AM
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From memory it has been mentioned on here that the 550 runs a magnetic (I think) clutch in the fan, that is ecu controlled. I don't know if there are any fuses in the system, but Nissan can probably activate a diagnostic mode to test it. How much they would cost is anyone's guess, but may help.

The other option it to get the engine up to operating temperature and open the bonnet and see if the fan is engaged. You could also try putting the cabin blower fan on max with the air-con on and see if the engine fan engages and disengages.
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Old 07-02-2018, 10:25 AM
Markev Markev is offline
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Thanks bods. I’m confident that the engine cooling fan isn’t working: I trust the auto electrician’s assessment that it’s not engaging. He’s thinking it’s a faulty fan based on the fact that the fan is freewheeling rather than having some resistance when manually spun. I’m not sure that’s the way the Ti550’s fan is designed. I’d just like to eliminate other reasons why the fan isn’t operating eg fuse or relay switch or something similar before Nissan jump to the same conclusion. A pessimistic attitude I know but I’ve been disappointed on many occasions in the past: I’d like to be surprised and have a change of heart. Thanks for your thoughts.
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Old 07-02-2018, 10:46 AM
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This is the one I recall seeing http://www.navara.asia/showthread.php?t=34362

Pretty indefinitive as to what type of fan it is, but may help a little bit.
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Old 07-02-2018, 11:35 AM
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I've checked the manual again (p74 of CO.pdf covers the V9X cooling fan assembly) and it describes examining the coupling like this:

Quote:
Fan Coupling
Inspect fan coupling for oil leakage and bimetal conditions.
Now, it IS possible for this coupling to fail - mine has failed twice so far. Expecting it to happen again before the car reaches 300,000km (less than 15K km to go).

They're silicone-oil filled chambers with a bimetal strip that acts as a valve. As the bimetal heats up, it turns the valve, causing the oil to create friction between the coupling drive shaft and the fan mounting face. As it "grabs" the shaft, the fan is driven harder by the engine.

Testing yours is easy. Some people will recommend the "newspaper" method - never do this. It involves inserting a rolled-up newspaper into the fan while the engine is running. Problem with this test is that while it will indicate a faulty coupling, it can also snap or crack fan blades. Since they're pulling forward, they'll eat the radiator. There is a better and more reliable method.

With a cold engine, open the bonnet and try turning the fan. Pay attention to how much effort is required. Now warm up the car - to normal operating temperature. Pull over, turn the engine off, pop the bonnet and try turning the fan by hand (keep in mind that everything under the bonnet is quite hot). If the fan turns really easily, the coupling is shot, you need a new one. If it's firmer (than it was when cold) to turn over, it's working.
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Old 07-02-2018, 12:53 PM
Markev Markev is offline
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Thanks Old.Tony. A very comprehensive answer. I’ll give your testing procedure a go tomorrow. If the coupling is shot what gets replaced - just a coupling or a complete fan kit? Is the replacement a job for a capable independent mechanic or would Nissan need to do it?

As an aside.... the manual to which you refer CO.pdf...... is that a soft version or hard copy and if it’s the former is it available to mugs like me, simply to have a browse thru? I understand if it’s only available to people who have ‘legitimate’ reasons to consult it.

Thanks again for your response. Given your coupling has failed a few times, it looks more likely my auto electrician’s initial diagnosis is correct. If that’s the case then in many ways I’m happy because it affirms my confidence in him/his workers.
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Old 07-02-2018, 08:45 PM
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There's an electronic manual that floats around from time to time and a few years back I snagged it. CO.pdf is one of the files in it, I referred to it for anyone else who happened to have it.

The manuals aren't supposed to be in circulation - Nissan try to keep them in-house, but they're a valuable resource for vehicle owners and there's always someone who'll sneak something out of anywhere if they're motivated enough.

The repair job isn't a difficult one and involves unbolting the fan+coupling, removing the fan from the coupling, putting the fan on the new coupling and bolting the new coupling+fan into place. Fan belt is left alone (isn't involved in this). I removed mine without removing the shroud from the radiator - I was very careful to wiggle it out without denting the back of the radiator.
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Old 08-02-2018, 07:01 AM
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Went for a drive and got the temp gauge to its normal halfway level. Once stopped fan blades spun with equal resistance prior to and after the trip. Therefore assume the coupling is faulty. Guess I’ll know more in a week’s time when Nissan can find time to check it out.

After the trip and before I stopped the engine I lifted the hood and noticed the fan spinning, albeit reasonably slowly. Easily stopped it by hand. Then a manual spin had the same ‘tension’ as cold engine.
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Old 08-02-2018, 07:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old.Tony View Post

They're silicone-oil filled chambers with a bimetal strip that acts as a valve. As the bimetal heats up, it turns the valve, causing the oil to create friction between the coupling drive shaft and the fan mounting face. As it "grabs" the shaft, the fan is driven harder by the engine.
it doesn't grab the shaft.
typically they are a pump, like a basic torque converter. the bimetal strip turns a valve which increases the flow of silicone oil.
most common problem is the silicone oil turns to crap. clean it out and replace it.
getting the right oil is the hard bit. some aftermarket places have it, i know toyota usually does.
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Old 08-02-2018, 10:49 AM
Markev Markev is offline
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Thanks Tweak’e for your input. If Nissan determines its a faulty coupling I hope they’d offer to refil the silicone oil as an option if it’s cost effective as opposed to simply replacing the coupling/fan. I guess from a warranty perspective they’d prefer a full fan replacement. Gee.....if things didn’t go wrong I wouldn’t learn anything........perhaps I’d prefer to stay ignorant! It’s an interesting journey.
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